The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out

wormsWe have recently discovered the benefits of composting. I had been thinking about it for a while – every time I threw a banana peel into the garbage -there’s got to be a better use for this. So, we looked more into it at the Burning River Fest. The people from The New Agrarian Center were very helpful, as was the guy from Great Lakes Brewing Company. Both are master composters.

Here’s what we did – it’s pretty simple. We bought a storage container (a big Rubbermaid one), some mesh screen, organic dirt, and 1,000 red worms. Drilled holes in the container – worms need to breathe air – and filled it with 6 inches of organic dirt and wet strips of newspaper and computer paper. This bedding is supposed to be moist, not dripping wet. The compost bin was set up in the basement, to avoid smell and dog curiosity, and so it could be bigger than under-the-sink. We left the light on for the first week to discourage the worms from escaping. Next, we collected all of our food scraps – banana peels, strawberry tops, bell pepper cores, onion peels, coffee grounds, etc. – and buried them under 2 inches of bedding. Now the worms take over. We’re supposed to put the food in a different place each time and add new bedding every 2 months. (Don’t put meat in your compost – it’ll attract rodents)

What’s the benefit of having a pound of red worms chewing up your food? Well, the whole process creates worm castings, which is this magical organic fertilizer that you can use in your garden. Essentially, it’s natural recycling. We eat the food, feed it to the worms, they turn it into fertilizer that we’ll use to grow herbs, which we’ll eat in the spring. Aside from the initial set-up, it doesn’t take a lot of work to maintain, and in about 4-6 months we’ll have some pretty awesome soil for our garden.

Wikipedia does a good job of describing vermicomposting, or you can Blackle it. Worms Eat My Garbage is supposedly the definitive composting guide. The Village Green does outdoor composting, which is an excellent way to get rid of weeds and fallen leaves. If you do start a compost bin, don’t dump your worms in the garden – red worms are not native to North America, and are an invasive species, which can threaten other earthworms.

(Here’s the rest of the worm song)

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About Terra Milo

Terra Milo is Your Computer Girl. She believes that technology runs on energy, so when you're creating websites and emails, you are literally sending energy to your potential clients. Make sure that energy is confident, positive, and enlightening! Terra teaches coaches and entrepreneurs all the computer skills they need to launch their business and spread their mission in the world. From websites to newsletters to social media, she will empower you with skills and confidence so you can infuse your messages with inspiration and love. www.terramilo.com

2 thoughts on “The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out

  1. Where did you buy your worms? A local bait shop? My husband and I want to start composting, but we don’t know where to get the worms (or how many we will need).
    Thanks!
    Sara in Akron

  2. Sara,
    I did get them at a local bait shop. But, if you want to take 1/2 of my compost, worms included, I’ll be glad to help you get started. My compost has worked so well that we have too many worms, and I’d love to cut it in 1/2.

    If so, can I e-mail you to work out the details? I have your e-mail address from your comment so don’t enter it in your comment.

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